Requested Recipe

The funny thing about writing on the Internet is that people assume I know what I'm writing about.  Ha!  Isn't that funny?  Hellooooooooooo out there … you can write on the Internet knowing absolutely nothing at all.

Last weekend I posted some pictures I took while making homemade chicken noodle soup for my sick son.  I couldn't believe how many requests I got for my recipe.

What makes you think it tasted good?

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Oh, but it did!  

Homemade soup is something I do well.  The problem is, I don't think I've ever made any type of soup the same way twice.  I wing it with whatever ingredients I have handy.  My "recipe" is really no more than just a general outline.

I also always make big batches of soup so I can freeze the leftovers for another night.  

I really suggest taking two days to make chicken noodle soup.  On the first day, make just the stock/broth.  On the second day, turn the stock into soup.  Breaking it into two days allows you to chill the broth overnight.  The fat will rise to the top and harden and be easy to remove before you make it into soup.  This makes your soup healthier and taste better at the same time. 

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Step 1:  Chicken Stock

You will need:

* A large stock pot

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* Lots of chicken thighs OR a whole chicken (don't use breasts they dry out) 

* Carrots – unpeeled, cut into chunks

* Celery – cut into chunks

* Onions – peeled and quartered 

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* Parsley

* A bay leaf if you have one handy

* Chicken bouillon (I use 1-2 tablespoons for a huge pot)

* Black peppercorns  (4 -8)

* Salts:  I use a combination of Kosher Salt, Celery Salt and Jane's Mixed Up Salt

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* Sometimes I'll use a clove or two of garlic in the broth, but not always.

Why haven't I listed specific quantities?  It varies depending on the size of your pot and your individual tastes.

Place all the ingredients in your stockpot.  Add water until the pot is almost full and bring to a boil.  Simmer uncovered for 2-4 hours depending on how much time you have.  Strain the entire contents of your stock pot through a colander.  

I throw out all the solids at this point. 

Why?

The chicken and vegetables have lost the majority of their flavor by cooking for so long.  All that flavor has been transferred to the broth.  I know some people de-bone the now flavorless chicken and use it in chicken tacos, chicken enchiladas or make chicken salad from it.  That is fine if you understand the chicken will not have much taste.  It will need to be mixed with other ingredients that drown out it's lack of flavor.  

Do not use the chicken or vegetables you used to make the stock in your soup!

Refrigerate the stock overnight.  After it has chilled, remove the fat which has hardened and surfaced to the top of your container.  If you made a lot you can use some of it for soup now and freeze some of it to use on a different day.

Step 2:  Chicken Noodle Soup

You will need:

* A large pot

* The chicken stock you already made – fat removed 

* Chicken (thighs have more flavor but you can use breasts if you want)

* Wide egg noodles

* Celery 

* Carrots 

* Onions

* Fresh Parsley (dice small)

* Olive oil

* Kosher salt, Celery Salt and Jane's Mixed Up Salt

* Fresh ground pepper

All of the ingredients for the soup are optional except for the pot, water, salt, and chicken.  If you don't like an ingredient, substitute in something you do like instead or simply omit the item.

(I chop all the veggies it into bite size chunks unless specified otherwise, but you can dice them smaller if you prefer.)

Preheat your oven to 350 degrees.  Rub the chicken lightly with olive oil, sprinkle with the salt(s) and ground pepper and roast until done.

When the chicken has cooled enough, remove the meat.  Throw the bones and skin away.  You can either dice up the chicken meat or shred it.  I usually shred mine.

Simmer the chicken stock adding in the celery, carrots, and onion.  Simmer for about 20 minutes if your vegetables are in big chunks, less if you diced them small.  Add a couple cups of noodles.  Continue to simmer.

Season with salt(s) and pepper to taste.

When the vegetables and noodles are tender add in the chicken meat and parsley.  Heat through.

Taste and adjust the seasonings if you need to before serving.

Again, it's up to you to decide quantities.  Do you like soup with more salt or less?  Do you like it thick and chunky like a stew, or do you prefer it as broth with just a few wisps of chicken floating in it?

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Serve with a loaf of fresh hot bread and a crisp green salad for a perfect fall/winter meal.

Enjoy!

© Twenty Four At Heart

27 Responses to “Requested Recipe”

  1. Jan

    You know, I was looking for suggestions on what to cook this weekend – I think I just found it! That looks absolutely delicious, girl!

  2. Jan

    You know, I was looking for suggestions on what to cook this weekend – I think I just found it! That looks absolutely delicious, girl!

  3. Jan

    You know, I was looking for suggestions on what to cook this weekend – I think I just found it! That looks absolutely delicious, girl!

  4. Liz C

    You’re right, it is funny when people assume I know what I’m taking about on my blog.
    Soup looks GOOD. You have reminded me that I am WAY overdue to make a batch of chicken stock.
    One thing you can do with the stock after you strain it is to reduce it down to, like, half, then freeze it in two cup quantities. Then you can add it to evil corporate stock or add water back to it when you use it.

  5. Liz C

    You’re right, it is funny when people assume I know what I’m taking about on my blog.
    Soup looks GOOD. You have reminded me that I am WAY overdue to make a batch of chicken stock.
    One thing you can do with the stock after you strain it is to reduce it down to, like, half, then freeze it in two cup quantities. Then you can add it to evil corporate stock or add water back to it when you use it.

  6. Liz C

    You’re right, it is funny when people assume I know what I’m taking about on my blog.
    Soup looks GOOD. You have reminded me that I am WAY overdue to make a batch of chicken stock.
    One thing you can do with the stock after you strain it is to reduce it down to, like, half, then freeze it in two cup quantities. Then you can add it to evil corporate stock or add water back to it when you use it.

  7. missy

    Just returned from the store with my stuff. Going to make the broth this morning and the soup tomorrow.

  8. missy

    Just returned from the store with my stuff. Going to make the broth this morning and the soup tomorrow.

  9. missy

    Just returned from the store with my stuff. Going to make the broth this morning and the soup tomorrow.

  10. missy

    Okay 24 readers, it literally took me 15 minutes to put this soup stock (phase 1) together. I bought a whole cut up chicken to save time and it was on sale anyway. I’m reserving the breasts for the soup along with the package of thighs I purchased. Had some fresh thyme and tossed that in as well. It’s gonna be a yummy dinner tomorrow night!

  11. missy

    Okay 24 readers, it literally took me 15 minutes to put this soup stock (phase 1) together. I bought a whole cut up chicken to save time and it was on sale anyway. I’m reserving the breasts for the soup along with the package of thighs I purchased. Had some fresh thyme and tossed that in as well. It’s gonna be a yummy dinner tomorrow night!

  12. missy

    Okay 24 readers, it literally took me 15 minutes to put this soup stock (phase 1) together. I bought a whole cut up chicken to save time and it was on sale anyway. I’m reserving the breasts for the soup along with the package of thighs I purchased. Had some fresh thyme and tossed that in as well. It’s gonna be a yummy dinner tomorrow night!

  13. Sarah

    Thing is, if you can make chicken soup worth eating, you’re like 17 steps ahead of me whether you have an actual recipe or not. **CLUELESSNESS** – mine cannot be overestimated! And this looks wonderful and sounds doable. Thaaaaaanks!

  14. Sarah

    Thing is, if you can make chicken soup worth eating, you’re like 17 steps ahead of me whether you have an actual recipe or not. **CLUELESSNESS** – mine cannot be overestimated! And this looks wonderful and sounds doable. Thaaaaaanks!

  15. Sarah

    Thing is, if you can make chicken soup worth eating, you’re like 17 steps ahead of me whether you have an actual recipe or not. **CLUELESSNESS** – mine cannot be overestimated! And this looks wonderful and sounds doable. Thaaaaaanks!

  16. missy

    Just ate the soup and it was so good and very comforting. A keeper. Thanks for sharing Suzanne.

  17. missy

    Just ate the soup and it was so good and very comforting. A keeper. Thanks for sharing Suzanne.

  18. missy

    Just ate the soup and it was so good and very comforting. A keeper. Thanks for sharing Suzanne.

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